2010.08.11-serial.00133

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Second paragraph of page 5. Let me read this paragraph. That now we have the words. They are not opposed. That we have the words. They are not related. Means that we should realize that arising is arising. In beginning, middle, and end, it is officially you can't insert a needle. Privately, you could drive a horse and a car and throw it. In beginning, middle, and end, arising is not related to, is not opposed to, ceasing. Though there is a sudden arising of dharmas where there had previously been ceasing, this is not the arising of ceasing.

[01:17]

It is the arising of dharmas. Because it is the arising of dharmas, it is not marked by opposition or relation. Nor are ceasing and ceasing in relation or opposition to each other. Ceasing is ceasing at beginning, middle and end. This is a case of in meeting he doesn't bring it out, but if you raise the idea, he knows it well. Though ceasing occurs suddenly where there had previously been arising, this is not the ceasing of arising. It is the ceasing of the firmness. Because it is the ceasing of the firmness, it is not proposed or related.

[02:26]

In this writing, he is talking about this Kaiindambaya or ocean-sea samadhi as a samadhi of buddhas and bodhisattvas. Common understanding of Kaiindambaya or ocean-sea samadhi is when the wind of ignorance ceases, then the waves, the movement of waves ceases. If the surface of water becomes very flat without moving, then the ocean can reflect everything as they are. But Dogen Zenji didn't like that idea. We need waves, and we need wind to balance.

[03:37]

In the case of Dogen's Kaindan Zamai, the wind is not the wind of ignorance, but the wind of Buddha's family. That's what Dogen mentioned in the Gensokyo. And, you know, waves are arising and perishing. But in our samadhi or in our zazen, we are sitting, as he said, in the very middle of this writing, walking or practicing on the shore face, and yet at the same time, we are walking on the bottom of the ocean. So both are there. In the bottom, there's no waves, but on the surface, still waves moving up. So we have both sides moving and working and changing, and really calming down still and peaceful.

[04:49]

In his time, These two sides are both there. And first he discussed about ki, or arising, and then he discussed about mezu, or perishing, or ceasing. First, it seems like he's discussing about this arising and basing of the water over each and every field. But as I discussed this morning, this method is not a question of he or arising. But this method is a succession of arising and basing.

[05:53]

That is what I think he discuss until here. And now he's talking, I think, about the relation between this ki and this method, not a question of ki. That's why he's talking about, he's saying, arising and persisting are not related. It's not opposed to each other. Arising is just arising. Beginning, middle, and end. Arising is just arising. And ceasing, metsu, is just metsu. To me, this arising and ceasing is the same thing as Dogen said in Shogun Genzo Zenki. I think I already reintroduced this in the very beginning of

[06:57]

He said, the great way of Buddhas and it is completely penetrated is first he said liberation and then he said manifestation. Liberation is for Manifestation is, of course, Genjo. So the Great Way of Buddha has two aspects, or two virtues. One is To-Datsu, another is Genjo. And I think you're already familiar with this word, Genjo, manifestation. To is like something we can go through, even though there is some separation or division, we can go through it.

[08:16]

For example, transparent. This is transparent. If there is some film, if the film is transparent, the light can go through. And transparent in Japanese is tou and me. So tou means something which can go freely even if there is certain division. or separation. And Datsu is saying Datsu in dropping of body and mind, Shinjin Datsu, Naku, fall down. So Togo Datsu means, and in Shoto Genzo Zenki he said, life is itself liberated from life.

[09:20]

And death is itself liberating from death. And he also said, life is a manifestation of total function, and death is also a manifestation of total function. There are two sides. One is manifestation, another is liberation. To me, this means, you know, when I was born, you know, this is born, and this body and five skandhas, after a few days, several days after the birth, you know, these five skandhas Masahiro. Until I became a Buddhist monk, my name was Masahiro. And when I received tokudo, my name became Showa.

[10:21]

So since then, this five skandhas is called Showa. And because I became a Buddhist monk, or a priest, these five skandhas manifest as Japanese, Buddhist, priest. And I have certain karma, or characteristics, that I can do and that I cannot do. Who I am, who I am not. That is how these five skandhas manifest. And yet, even though I am a Japanese, I am a Buddhist, I am a priest, as a genjou, But at the same time, I'm not a priest. I'm a priest only when I wear a koromo and okesa and do a priest activity. And I'm a Buddhist only when I compare myself with some people who are not Buddhist.

[11:24]

And I'm not a Japanese until I knew there are some people who are not Japanese. Until then, I'm just me. But when I study that there are other people who are not Japanese, I start to understand that I'm Japanese, and I'm not American, I'm not French, I'm not Chinese. But then I don't compare these five skandhas with other five skandhas. Then this is not Japanese, this is not Buddhist. That is what Toda's means. As a Genjo, I'm a Japanese Buddhist priest, but that is only this side. At the same time, I'm not. There are two sides.

[12:26]

And, for example, in Shogun or Bussho or Buddha nature, Shogun's call these two sides as U BUSSHO and MU BUSSHO U BUSSHO is BUDDHA nature and MU BUDDHA nature so these are not two separate aspect as 50-50 or half and half, but both are 100%. That is, this means not related with each other. This is not half and half. And life and death is the same.

[13:27]

Like in Zenki, he said, life is a manifestation of total function. Life is everything, 100%. When we are alive, we are 100% alive. And when we are dead, we are 100% dead. There is no way half and half. Half alive, half dead. Even we are in a near-death experience, If we are still alive, we are 100% alive. If we are dead, we are 100% dead. So life and death never meet each other. But when we think about life and think about death, this becomes the opposite thing. And because I cling to life, life is something I need.

[14:30]

I like, I hope, continue, and this is something I don't want to be together. So in our thinking, life and death is opposite each other. But as a reality, life is 100% and death is also 100%. They never meet each other. If I don't even say the film, we are allowed to just leave. And the film will die. Of course, we cannot do anything else. But only within life we can think, and we can create discrimination and irrationality. I want to make a choice, but somehow my other choice doesn't work so well.

[15:34]

That's why we suffer. But according to Dōgen, that is part of our life, so we need to accept that way of life as human beings. Anyway, I think that is what he is discussing here. kind of a relation between liberation and manifestation. And he said there's no such relation, no such dualistic half-and-half relation, and so therefore they are not opposed to each other. The sentence is a little strange, I think that is the point he is discussing in this poem. That too, that now we have the words, they are not opposed.

[16:39]

So these two sides, arising and perishing, or liberation and manifestation, are not opposed to each other. And they are not related to each other. We should realize that arising is arising. Arising is simply arising. Manifestation is manifestation. In the beginning, middle and end, it is official. You cannot insert a need. Privately, you could drive a horse and cart and slow it. This is a popular Zen expression. But not particularly Zen. It's kind of a proverb in China. For example, public government office.

[17:44]

Officially, they are so strict. Nothing which is not mentioned in the law or rules or regulations. They cannot do anything. But privately, if they go back gate, everything can go. That is the meaning of this proverb, this saying. And this is what means, I think, things arising, just arising. And yet, nothing is like a garden. There is nothing alive and nothing perish. That is what Tordak means. There is nothing. It's not me that is born. It's not Shoha that is living or that is speaking now.

[18:48]

It's not Shoha is going to die. So, actually nothing is born, nothing is living, nothing dies. Life and death, life and death is just the name of this process of I gather, appear, and stay for a while, and disappear. Nothing arises, nothing perishes. That is the meaning. So, officially, nothing arise, nothing preach. But privately, I'm here. Shohaku is a reality given by Shohaku. And Shohaku has Shohaku's word. And everything, all people and everything is part of my word. So everything is there. It's part of my life. Which I always say, when I was born, when we are born, this person and the entire world are born together.

[20:02]

And when we are living, me, this person, and the entire world is living together. And when this person dies, this entire world dies with this person. That is fact, you know, privately everything is there it needs. And yet nothing is there, officially. That is the meaning of this program. And if we want to use that, with this technical term, this is an ultimate truth and a conventional truth. Officially you get nothing. Everything is empty. But privately or as a conventional reality, everything is taken out. Nothing is rejected or get renewed. Everything there is taken out. And another expression Dogen Zenji used is abundance and abundance.

[21:05]

So our practice, our life is going beyond abundance and deficiency. That means we can be both and either. And actually beyond such, you know, both are 100% they are the same kind. so officially you cannot insert a needle. Privately, you could drive a horse and a car and swim. In beginning, middle, and end, arising is not related to, is not opposed to, ceasing. So arising and ceasing are not oppositional to each other. Though there is the sudden arising or direct of darkness, where there had previously been ceasing.

[22:18]

This is not the arising of ceasing. It is the arising of darkness. You know, arising means ceasing at the opposition of arising. You know, same as waves arise and cease. That is one meaning. This I am facing and this facing are different from this morning. But this is also facing. In this case, phenomenon is ceasing and arising opposite each other. They are both arising and perishing of dharma. Therefore, arising and perishing are not relative or opposite each other. This is just a transformation of dharma.

[23:23]

of movement and changing of dharma. So this arising and perishing are not really opposition to each other. Because it is arising of dharmas, it is not marked by opposition or relation. Nor are ceasing and ceasing This ceasing and ceasing, this ceasing and this ceasing. Ceasing and ceasing in relation or opposition to each other. So this ceasing and this ceasing are also not opposition to each other. That means we don't need to eliminate this arising and ceasing or perishing. This is 100% reality. And this makes our ceasing, that the ceasing of arising and perishing is also 100%.

[24:29]

So these two are not related to each other. And these two are not opposite each other. And this one, this is not opposite each other. Everything is 100%. That is a very strange logic. That is Dawkins' logic. So ceasing is ceasing at the beginning, middle, and end. This is a case of in meaning, he doesn't bring it out. But if you raise the idea, he knows it then. That means then we say one thing, one aspect, and we don't talk about other things. But when we take a close look at it, they are all there. I think that is what this means.

[25:30]

This is also another popular expression in the liturgy. So even though we don't discuss as a conceptual way as two separate and related things. But when we take a look at these, they are all there and working together. So in meeting, he didn't bring it up. We don't need to discuss about it. So we are thinking, and we are separating these things, and we discuss how these are related. So now we are thinking and talking about the map, not the reality.

[26:38]

but within reality, that is happening in meeting, in reality. Both are, everything is always there and simply happening. Though ceasing occurs suddenly where there had previously been arising, this is not the ceasing of arising. It is the ceasing of the dharmas. So everything is the movement of dharmas. Therefore there is no such separation. Because it is the ceasing of the dharmas, it is not opposed or related. And the next short paragraph. it be the this is of ceasing or the this is of arising, it is just the ocean-sea samadhi, called the dharmas.

[27:51]

The practice and verification of this is is not non-existent. It is just this undefined, which is called the ocean scene. Here, he discusses, talks about the final sentence of the quote from Vassal's set. What Vassal said is, this is called There is soku, your body.

[29:00]

And here, this one, this is. There is this. And me is name. And E is, together we call name, kai in zanmai. So this is named or called kai in zanmai. And here in this paragraph, this is a translation of zei soku. Zei soku, this is itself. This is itself. called Kainzanmaru. So this means this arising and perishing without any relation or opposition or duality. That movement is itself called ocean-seeing samadhi.

[30:09]

Whether it be the beast is, this is also the thought of ceasing, or the thought of arising, whether in the case of arising or ceasing, this is simply called kāinzana. It is just the ocean-sail samādhi, And he said, this kind of mind is nothing other than the movement of dharmas. That is yo-i, shi-o. All dharmas are moving and transforming, arising and perishing. And this movement itself is ocean-serious one. And we are part of it.

[31:16]

Five Skandhas are part of this movement of darkness. And the practice and verification of this is, this focus is, is not non-existent. So we are practicing within this movement. So we can say there is no practice. This is fact. The Nangakuse, when he was asked by Huinan, the Sixth Ancestor, what is that darkness? And is there practice and verification? Nangakuse, we cannot say there is no practice and verification. And yet, practice and verification are not being defined. So it is not non-existent.

[32:18]

It is just this undefined. That means everything is movement of dharma. There is no dust. No dust on the mirror. If there is dust, dust is a part of this dharma. So there is no way this mirror is defined. Which is called the ocean-serious mind. That is kāyin-zan mind. Next is a kind of a conclusion of this first section. quite long and very complicated.

[33:24]

I can't finish this afternoon. Almost all the expression came from some hands. So, let me read firstly, let me read the paragraph, then I'll speak. sentence by sentence. Samadhi is a realization. It is a saying. It is in the night when the hand gropes for the pillow behind. The groping for a pillow or the hand groping for the pillow behind in the night Like this is not merely hundreds of millions of tens of thousands of calipers.

[34:27]

It is in the ocean. I always only preach the Lotus Sutra of the wondrous Dharma. Because he does not state, I arise, I am in the ocean. The former face is the I-always bridge, or the slightest motion of a single wave, and 10,000 waves follow. And the latter face is the Lotus Sutra of the Wanderer's Dharma, or the slightest motion of 10,000 waves, and a single wave follows. Whether we wind up or let out a line over 1,000 feet or 10,000 feet, what we regret is that it goes straight down.

[35:31]

The former face and latter face here are, I am on the face of the ocean. like folding the former head and the latter head. The former head and the latter head are putting a head on top of your head. It is not that in the ocean there is someone. I am in the ocean. It is not where the world dwells. It is not what is loved by the sages. I am in, alone in the ocean. This is the preaching of always only. This in the ocean does not belong to the center.

[36:36]

It does not belong to inside or outside. It is remaining forever. preaching the Lotus Sutra. Though it is not in East, West, North or South, it is, I come home with a free empty boat, laden with moonlight. This true return is immediately coming back home. Who could call it the conduct of getting drenched. It is realized only at the limit of the way of the Buddha. We take this as the seal of sealing water. Expressing it further, it is the seal of sealing sky. Expressing it further, it is the seal of sealing mud.

[37:43]

The seal of sealing water is not necessarily the seal of sealing the ocean. Beyond this, there must be further the seal of sealing the ocean. This is called the ocean seal, called the water seal, called the mud seal, called the mind seal, singly transmitting the mind's seal. It seals water, seals mud, seals the sky. I hope you understand. I don't really understand. But I introduced the fact that these different expressions came from, and if we understand the meaning of each expression in the original writings or expressions, then probably we know, but don't know what to say.

[38:54]

That is my hope. First, he said, Samadhi is a realization, it is a saying. Realization is, of course, Genjo. Samadhi is Genjo. And he also said, Samadhi is Dōtoku. That is, saying means. I already talked about Dōtoku. That means, ah, toku. expression of Dharma. So, according to Dogen, Samadhi, our practice of Zazen, not only Zazen, our life itself is within this Kaiin Zanmai.

[40:01]

So this Samadhi, Kaiin Zanmai, is manifestation. It's actually happening. And it's Kenjo. It's really happening right now, right here. It's not somewhere else. beyond this world. This is what is happening inside and outside of ourselves. That is samadhi. And that manifestation is itself an expression of dōtoku. Whether we have the ability to speak something using words or not, things happening is itself an expression of karma. And we are part of it. It is in the night. This in the night came from the koan story I talked this morning about ungan and domo, about the southern

[41:15]

hands and eyes of Bodhisattva, compassion, or Avalokiteshvara. In that conversation, Dong Ho said, it is like the way Avalokiteshvara uses those thousand hands and eyes is like a person sleeping in the night, in the complete darkness, losing the pillow and trying to find This, in the night, means no separation, no discrimination. This darkness of the night is same darkness in, for example, in Sandokan, you know, it's May and April. Brightness and darkness, light and dark, light and dark, you know.

[42:18]

Darkness means no discrimination. Light means discrimination or distinction. We can see the difference of each and everything. But in complete darkness, before we have electricity in the night, if there's no moon, it's still completely dark. We can't see anything. No discrimination. We can't realize anything. It's one whole darkness. But within this no discrimination, somehow application for a person's living can reach the pure. That means without making discrimination, application can help. You said something that hit me in my heart.

[43:26]

What is happening is itself the expression of the dharma. And where in this paragraph did that, in this big paragraph, did that come from? I think that comes from me. I hope it comes also from this paragraph. But I think that is what Botoku means. Genjo is itself Botoku. Genjo is itself expression. So, it's not clearly mentioned in this Bible. It comes from myself. I hope it's right. So, in the night, the hand gropes for the pillow, behind. This is the activity of Genjo in this Kainzan, same as the activity of Avalokiteshvara, without making discrimination.

[44:36]

And the gloating for a pillow, the hand gloating for the pillow behind in the night, like this is not merely hundreds of millions of tens of thousands of kalpas. This is forever. And this number came from another, one chapter of Lotus Sutra. The Lotus Sutra, the name of the chapter is Jō Fugyō Gosatsupo Nagoji Sattva This dharma is eternal. The person practices and preaches this dharma, this long, numerous karmas. So this means, within this darkness, this, you know, groping the pillow continues forever, many karmas.

[45:47]

And it is in the ocean, I always only preached the Lotus Sutra of the Wanderer's Time. This expression came from another chapter of the Lotus Sutra. The name of the chapter is Devadatta. Devadatta. I think Karl Wilhelm translated that. In the chapter of Devadatta in the Lotus Sutra, there are two stories. One is about this person, Devadatta, who was the cousin of Shakyamuni Buddha. And because he separated the Sangha, and wanted to become the head of the Sangha, he fell down in the hell. But that did not stop this saving of hell.

[46:52]

Another part of this chapter of the book of Manota Sutra is about the dragon god. Manjushri was living in the ocean, staying in the ocean. He was living in the ocean and stayed at the Palace of Dragon King. And he was always preaching this Lotus Sutra. Lotus Sutra literally means Kekyo. Ho is Dharma. and a K in flower.

[47:56]

And this flower refers to the lotus, so we call this a lotus flower. So Sutra of Dharma Flower. And in that story, a magician said, I will stay in the ocean. and always expanding this sutra of dharma flower. And of course, a priest from Dogenzen uses dharma flower, sutra of dharma flower. or a scripture written in material, is really a dharma flower. Flower of dharma. That means reality as a dharma. And each and every being is like a flower of dharma. So this is a sense of magician.

[49:05]

That means, while we are practicing within this ocean seal samadhi, we are always expounding and we are expressing the Dharma, the Dharma flower. Not only so-called Buddhist or Zen practitioners, but each and every thing, flowers, leaves, and other things. Everything is really expanding Dharma flower. Dogen Zenji composed a waka poem that mountains, the color of the mountains and sound of the valley stream are all Shakyamuni Buddha's shape or color and form or voice. So really everything is expanding or expressing this Dharma flower.

[50:16]

So, our practice is also expressing Dharma through our day-to-day activities, not only sitting in the Zen room. That is what this Osha-Zitsi Samadhi means. When we are expressing this Dharma flower in each and every activity, then our life as a whole becomes high in dharma. Because he does not state, I arise, this is what is said in the verse of God, I am in the ocean. So here, ocean means this, as I always say, this entire network of interdependent origination now is called the ocean.

[51:20]

So we are in the ocean. We are in this connectedness. So, we don't say I arise or I perish. All dharmas that are connecting each other are changing, transforming. So, every one of us is in the ocean already. The former phase is the I-always-reach-it. This is a part of Maitreya's saying, I-always-reach-it, of the slightest motion of a single wave. And 10,000 waves follow. This is another one. This expression comes from a poem by other masters.

[52:35]

whose name is Sensu Tokujiro. He is a dharma brother of Ungan and Do. Ungan and Do are people who discuss about... about Feshwa. And this Sen's Tokujo was a fellow of my brother. They are all disciples of Yaku-san, Iri, or Yausha. And this person is a kind of interesting person. When their teacher, Yaku-san, died, those three people discussed what they are going to do. Possibly sense for the older type of brother.

[53:40]

Sense Tokujo said, I don't want to be a Zen master. I don't want to be an adult of a morass. So I want to live by the river and to be a boatman. This boatman is really a good set of work. to ferry people from this shore to the other shore. So he didn't want to become an abbot of a monastery. And he asked two of them, Unga and Lomo, to establish a monastery and to transmit Yakusan's Dharma to the next generation. But he asked them, if you find some great person, please send that person to me. He didn't want to be a teacher, but he wanted to have a disciple without being a teacher.

[54:48]

So in a sense, he is a kind of a lazy person teaching and cheating. Did he want to be a literal boatman? Like, actually operating a ferry? Yes, yes he was. He didn't mean that, like, in a sense. Actually, he did. He was a real boatman. Yeah. I mean, because there's also the expression, you know, using the dominant to carry you to the other side, kind of thing. That is an interpretation. Anyway, then Dogo found a very eminent person who was already a teacher. He was not a Zen monk yet, but he was a lecturer.

[55:48]

He was talking about Dharmakaya. While he was talking about Dharmakaya, Dogo was in the assembly, and he started to laugh. Then, that person, whose name was Kassa, Zen name, in Japanese, I forget his Chinese pronunciation. But, anyway, he came to Dogo and asked, why did you laugh at me? when I was talking about dharmakāra. And Dōgo said, your understanding is OK, but you never meet or encounter with real dharmakāra. That means you only know as an interruption, as a theory. So Dōgo sent this person to his dharmakāra

[56:51]

And this person became a Dalai Lama of Zen structure. And he later discussed some of the Dalai Lama's very great Zen master. So his Dalai Lama continued. Anyway, this Fat Dogen quote is this person's Zen structure's quote. And I think in the note, there is a Karl Wilhelm translation. But I found another translation. This is from Zen's Chinese Paintings by Andy Booth. And in this translation, this empire poem is letting down the line 10,000 feet.

[58:02]

So he was talking about the water. So he thinks he is fishing. Letting down the line 10,000 feet. A breaking wave makes ten thousand ripples. At night, in still water, the cold fish won't bite. An empty boat filled with moonlight returns. This is his poem. Maybe Karl's translation is more literal. But the second line, in fact, I will quote here. That is, a breaking wave, one breaking wave, makes 10,000 waves. I think in Carl Beutler's translation, or in his translation, one wave moves, 10,000 waves follow.

[59:07]

in the same night. Last line, and then he bought. Page 146. So he was fishing, and his sled go straight down for 10,000 feet means limitless depth. According to, I think, Kishitawa Iyamoto, this is straight. Also, this means, you know, the, what do you call it? The hook? It's straight. It's straight. It's straight. Not only the line. The hook is straight. So there's no bite.

[60:18]

It is really deep, and look, it's straight. But anyway, when one wave moves, 10,000 waves follow the movement. That is a movement of interdependent oscillation. Then, at night in still water, the cold fish won't bite. So this is in the night, and the moon is shining, and in the winter it's a cold night. So even though he was fishing all night, no fish bite, because there's no bite, nothing to bite. Therefore, an empty boat, so he cannot He couldn't catch any fish, so now his boat is empty.

[61:22]

Empty boat filled with moonlight and returns. So his fishing is really good for nothing. And even he had no intention to catch a fish. This is his description of his practice. of kainzan, and also awazazen. Awazazen is simply we put the line deeply into our life, and our foot is straight, so nothing we can expect to catch. In awazazen, this is really good for nothing. But somehow, probably this person enjoying this cold night, quiet, very quiet, and nothing to touch, but very beautiful.

[62:30]

That is a description of his father. Sawaki Kodoroshi said, Our Zazen is like... He is not so great a person. His expression is very interesting, not so great, but funny. He said, our Zazen is like a thief, thief break into an empty house. Our Zazen is like a thief break into an empty house, asking to escape. Therefore, we don't need to escape. So we gain nothing, but we find peacefulness there. That is another expression of our zazen, that is good for nothing. It's good for nothing, but it's good for nothing.

[63:32]

It's not good for something, but itself is good, but for nothing. I really like this definition. We're going for nothing. Our profit doesn't need to be good for something to get something. But this beautiful activity with others is a free one and gain nothing. So we don't need to calculate how much we can make money. any such expectation. There's no calculation, no expectation, but just quiet activity of, you know, putting the strength, learning, deeply in our life. This is the poem by this person, Sense Tokujo, and Togen Zenji quote the second line of this poem.

[64:37]

That means, even though our zazen is good for nothing, just sitting, like a sleep, breathing into an empty house, still, because of Saki Roshi's zazen, many people started to practice zazen. That is, one wave moves, 10,000 waves follow us. And one of the people who started to practice Zazen following Saoki Roshi Zazen was my teacher. Because of Uchiyama Roshi Zazen, I somehow started to practice. So Saoki Roshi started by himself for a few years. and that really just sit every day, every night, by himself, without even eating good food.

[65:44]

That was the beginning of his practice of Zazen. Before that, he was studying Yogacara teachings at a yoga or social monastery in Nara. But he found that many people at his time would like to study Buddhism and become a scholar. But he found that many people really, really practice Buddhism. he was almost reaching the point he received he could qualify as a teacher in Yomachan school, but he quit that path and he asked the adult of that monastery to allow him to live in a half-broken temple which has no entrance. and he closed the temple gate and sat by himself for two or three years.

[66:50]

So that was the beginning of Sadhu's real Zazen, focus on sitting. And from that sitting, by himself, So Ocean Seal Samadhi is a description of reality. Nothing we do is good for anything. That is, everything is good for nothing. So the difference between realization and non-realization is non-realization we think, we hope, we try to have a hope.

[67:53]

Anyway, even if we have a hook at the end. Because he doesn't know which. Yeah. Like this? How come so much writing about this? I don't know. He, you know, dog and goat, you know, 95 of this kind of writing, right? It's really amazing. You have something to say? What does seal mean in all this mud seal? We can talk later, at the end of this talk. Well, anyway, this is a topic in court. So, the slightest motion of a single wave and 10,000 waves follow.

[69:12]

That is the second line of this person's poem. And the latter phase is the Lotus Sutra on the Wanderer's Dharma slightest motion of 10,000 waves and a single wave followed. So this is simply opposition. That means not only one wave affects all the entire dharma universe, but the movement of everything within this dharma universe affect me, and we follow that ten thousand diamonds. So, ground waves affect all millions of waves, and millions of waves affect this person's life.

[70:20]

So each and everything are related and connected and work together. Whether we wind up or let out a line of a thousand feet, this is the first line of his poem. Whether we lift up, wind up, or rise up, or let out, that means we move this line. When we let out a line of a thousand feet, or ten thousand feet, much deeper, what we regret is that it goes straight down. That means the foot is straight. You don't need to regret. But somehow, as a common sense, the purpose of fishing is catching a fish.

[71:27]

So the hook should be bent, and there must be something attractive. So is that like the fourth line of the Genjo Koan? Fourth line? In flowers, whatever that line is. Flower falls. In our... Is that regret? Is that the same regret? Now I can't think. I'm confused. Fighting against this. Take everything later. So we regret. We are sorry, but... There's no hook and no bite. So we cannot expect any fish to catch. So we are like a fish brought into an empty house.

[72:30]

Nothing here. No gaining idea. No gaining idea. That is another example of taking advantage and losing advantage. If you try to get in, there's nothing. The former face and latter face. I think former face and latter face is Genjo and Toda's manifestation and revelation. Here, eyes on the face of the ocean. So, in that case, we are on the face of the ocean. We are in this network of interdependent organizations. They are like saying, the former head and the latter head. These genjou and tozatsu are, it can be said these are two.

[73:38]

and these are completely different and yet completely the same. And that is what he said next. The former head and the latter head are putting a head on top of your head. Usually this expression, putting a head on top of your head, means we do something One head is enough. If we put another head on our head, this is something extra. So better not to do such a thing. But here this is, by using this expression, Dogen said, this Kenjo and Tozatsu are completely the same thing. Both are the same head. So if we think these are two separate things, But it is a mistake. It is not that in the ocean there is someone.

[74:43]

That means there is a certain individual person. Because everything is connected as a thread, and everything is just a knot of those threads. I am in the ocean, but you can say I am in the ocean. is not fear the worldly realm. It is not what is loved by sages. Again, this expression came from somewhere. This is a part of a poem by Sekito Kisen. The title of the poem is The Song of Grasshopper. Ah, where is it? Karl Wilfred made a translation of the parts of that poem only Dogen Zenji used.

[75:55]

The entire poem is really beautiful, and I found a translation by Taiden. Taiden Dango. in the book of Cultivating the Empty Field. This is a really beautiful poem, so let me read the entire poem. So, this poem is written by Sekito Kisen, who is a teacher of Yakusan Igen. Takusan is a feature of Ungan, Dogo, and Sensu, the boatman. Their feature is Takusan. And Takusan's feature is Sekitou Kisen. And Sekitou Kisen Daiyosho is a person who composed also Sandokai. I think your family has a long poem.

[77:00]

So this is another poem by Sekitou Kisen. I've built a grass hut where there is nothing of value. After eating, I relax and enjoy a nap. When the hut was completed, fresh weeds appeared. Now it's being lived in covered by weeds. The person in the hut lives here calmly, not stuck to inside, outside, or in between. Places worldly people live, he doesn't live. Realms worldly people love, she doesn't love.

[78:05]

Though the hut is small, it includes the entire world. In ten feet square, an old man illumines forms and their nature. A Mahayana bodhisattva trusts without doubt. The middling or lowly lowly cannot help wondering, will this hut perish or not? Will this hut perish or not? Perishable or not, the original master is present, not dwelling south or north, east or west, firmly based on steadiness. It cannot be surpassed. A shining window below the green pines, jade palaces or vermilion towers,

[79:11]

cannot compare with it. Just sitting with head covered, all things are at rest. Thus, this mountain monk doesn't understand at all. Living here, he no longer works to get food. Who would proudly arrange seats trying to entice guests. Turn around the light to shine within, then just return. The vast, inconceivable source can't be faced or turned away from. Meet the ancestral teachers. Be familiar with their instructions. Bind glasses to build a heart, and don't give up. Let go of hundreds of years and relax completely.

[80:17]

Open your hands and walk in it. Thousands of words, myriad interpretations, are only to free you from obstructions. If you want to know the undying in a hat, don't separate from this skin bag here and now. This is the point. So this person is living in a small hat. Actually, his name Sekito means, literally means stone head. That means he built a small hat on the top of this huge stone. That's why he was called Sekito. And he lived in that small hut. So this is a poem about his small hut. And Dogen Zenji used three phrases from Akinchi.

[81:25]

Can I talk a little? Can I finish this paragraph? It's not a good place to start. I am in the ocean. It is not where the world will end. And it is not far. It is loved by the sages. This is not an exact quotation, but he used the expression, Sektō used, that is, in this poem, Sektō says, places worldly people live, he doesn't live. Realms worldly people love, she doesn't love. and he twisted this expression. So, this ocean, this ocean is not the place where the worldly dwell, and it's not what is loved by the sages.

[83:01]

Sekito said it's loved by the worldly people, but he changed it and said, this is not the place Both worldly people and sages are not dwelling or are alive. That means there is no such distinction between worldly people or sages. That means really completely all beings are within this ocean. No exception. I am in alone in the ocean. That means, you know, within this ocean, each and every one of us is existing as a knot of this network. So if, when I touch one knot, I touch entirely.

[84:04]

So, for this person, this is entirely my world. All beings within this network is part of me. That is what the expression, Jinjutsu Bōkai Shinjutsu Nintai, or Entire Ten Direction One, is a true human body. So this is a true human body. And if each person, each being, has its own entire ten-directional world. We are living together within ten-directional world, and everything is in this world. That's why I told you in this example, when we sit in for a short period of time, this entire universe becomes enlightenment, and each and every being reveals its own enlightenment.

[85:15]

This is my work. So even though there is no such person in the world, that is one side, but this entire world is my world. So I am alone in the world. This is the preaching of always only. So everything within this is expression of Dharma flower. So always only came from the sayings of the Manjushri. I always stay in the ocean and always preaching or expanding only Dharma. And this, in the ocean, does not belong to the center. This does not belong to the center, also came from Sekito's poem. This does not belong to center or outside or in between. That means there is no such separation between center or outside or in between.

[86:24]

This is completely including everything. And it does not belong to inside or outside. There is no inside and outside. It is remaining forever. Remaining forever also came from Manjushri's I am there in the ocean, always. Preaching the Lotus Sutra. So everything within this ocean is preaching or expanding Dharma flower. Though it is not in the east, west, north or south, this also came from Sector 12. It says, not dwelling south or north, east or west. There is no such divided capital.

[87:29]

This is entirely one home. It is, I come home with a free empty boat laden with moonlight. This came from the boatman's friend. Because he cannot catch any fish, his boat is empty. And with this, on this empty boat, he returned home. Under the moonlight. This true return is immediately coming back home. This true return is jitsu. So when the jitsu is true, or real, or genuine, And he is going back to eternal.

[88:38]

And Togenzen-ji used this word, this expression, jikki, in Shobo-genzo, Kie-sanbo, taking refuge in Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha. And he said, we take refuge in Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha because those three treasures, Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha, is the place we He barely returned. Barely returned. So this returning is not returning to the source. Returning to... Returning with empty hands and an empty body. Immediately coming back home. This immediate coming back home also came from sexual pleasure. He said, turn around the light to shine within, then just return.

[89:44]

This first part, turning around the light to shine within, is a famous expression, eko hensho. Dogen Zen uses this expression, eko hensho, Tsukasa Zen, Turn the Light Inward and Illuminate the Self. This originally appeared from Seki in Seto Point, the Kofun Shrine, and returned to the path. Faith is really long. Who could call it the conduct of getting drenched? From here he discusses about this sealing of water, sky, and man. Who could call it the conduct of getting drenched? Getting drenched is an expression of a practice of bodhisattva, like a water bath.

[90:54]

We, Bodhisattvas, practice like a water buffalo who is working in the muddy water to help to grow the rice. It's a really tough work, but Bodhisattva need to work always in the muddy water. So that is expression of Bodhisattva path. We work together with all beings within the muddy water to bloom the Dharma flower, the lotus flower. So getting drenched, we could call it the conduct of getting drenched. It is a versatile practice. It is realized only at the limit of the way of the Buddhas.

[91:59]

Limit means... How can I say? Highest point, pinnaku. Pinnaku, peak. Peak of the Buddha's way. to practice with all beings within the muddy water, within this ocean. We take this as a seal of sealing water. Here he is kind of playing with words. There is not a chord, but an expression by many Zen masters, called San Yin. San Yin is three seas.

[93:04]

And those three seas are seas of water, sky, or emptiness, or space. But this Chinese character for sky or space and emptiness is the same Chinese character, 空, so we can read this 空 as sky or space, empty space or emptiness. Anyway, this feeling water, feeling sky or space, The three marks are called three Cs. I'm not going to explain what are these three, but depending upon the commentary, all three could refer to two things.

[94:13]

One is the quality or capability of practitioners, low, middle, and high. Or these three could be a symbol of three bodies of Buddha. That is, Dharmakaya, Sambhogakaya, and Nirvanakaya. Here, that is not important for talking. This is just a, I think, this is just a frame with words. With this expression, Kaiin, or ocean sea. He just combined this ocean seal and these three seals. And this ocean seal samadhi includes all of them. Sealing the water, sealing the sky or space, and sealing the mind.

[95:15]

That means people practicing within this ocean seal samadhi can work with everything, whether those three group of people have different capability or capacity, or if it is dharmakaya, asambhogakaya or nirmanakaya, whatever. Our practice within this Ocean City Samadhi is about everything. Whatever comes up, we work with it. So we don't need to think with each of those three things so much. So I just read. We take this as a seal of sealing water. Sealing water. Expressing it further, it is a seal of sealing sky.

[96:19]

Expressing it further, it is a seal of sealing mud. The seal of sealing water is not necessarily the seal of sealing the ocean. I don't know what this means. Beyond this, there must be further the seal of sealing the ocean. So in two continuous sentences, This is not necessarily ocean sea, but this is also ocean sea. Beyond this, there must be further the sea of sea, the ocean. This is called the ocean sea, called the water sea, called the mud sea, called the mind sea. So what he really wants to say is mind sea.

[97:23]

Shin means king. Shin, mind or heart, shin. This is what has been transmitted from Buddha to the ancestors throughout eight generations. And this mind, shin, has been transmitted. And we achieve. So this Ocean Seal Samadhi, practice within this ocean of interconnectedness. This fact has been transmitted from Buddha. And that we receive. So we continue this transmission. Simply transmitting the mind's seal. It seals water, seals mud, seals Whatever we encounter is our life.

[98:31]

To live with this attitude with Bodhisattva Baba is our ocean-sea samadhi as our entire life. And our zazen is part of that samadhi. I finished. From tomorrow morning I start

[98:56]